Posts By :

Felicia Ricci

Be a Great Actor While Singing

A couple months ago I wrote an article on how to hold a difficult emotion while performing -- without breaking down or losing it.

But because it's a complex subject, I wanted to follow up with a video explaining exactly how to do this.

Today's video tackles the "acting" side of performing a song. How do you embody real emotion while you sing -- without buckling under the weight of that emotion?

In the video below, you'll learn:

  • How meaningful memories from your life can anchor you to certain emotions
  • Why it's important onstage to have imagery that keeps you grounded & safe
  • How emotion "lives" in the body
  • How singing "from" that body part can make your performance truly soar!

If this sounds weird, don't worry -- I'll walk you through each step!

 

Was this video helpful? Will you use these techniques when you perform? Are you ready to take your performing to the next level?

Let me know what you think!

xo Fel

P.S. If you watched all the way until the end then you heard -- I'm re-opening my elite training program, Singing Transformation, very soon!

This year is going to be awesome....more live hangouts with me, and other goodies. There are limited slots, so be sure to sign up for the waitlist below!

Being An Old Man Helped My Singing (No, Seriously)

What do a park-dwelling Birdman, an old hunchback, and a golden-kneed soccer player have in common?

Watch my latest singing tips video to find out!

In this video, you'll learn how my performing onstage with my musical improv group gave me insight into a new strategy for relieving vocal tension. Specifically: that my playing *old, male characters with hip-loaded posture* helped me to bust singing tension!

Here's my conclusion: loading your hips, tucking your pelvis under, and bending slightly at the waist can help to un-tense your neck, shoulders, and throat. (This is similar to the "butt clench" technique I often advocate for belt singing -- thrusting your energy DOWN into your lower body can help to free up your upper body.)

Yup, I know it sounds crazy. And no, I'm not kidding about this!

 

(NOTE: In the video, when I play my weird old man characters, I stick my neck out a bit, kind of like a "chicken-neck." Resist the urge to do this. The most important part is sinking into the hips, not craning your head forward.)

You, too, can wield the power of singing with a more hip-loaded posture, and feel firsthand how it helps to relieve tension in your neck and face.

Practice using the tips contained in this video -- and let me know what you think!

Improvisationally yours,

Fel

Sing Better By Opening Your FACE

Today's topic: Your FACE affects your singing!

Don't believe me? In my latest video, you'll learn how a personal vocal struggle led me to investigate the inside of my mouth -- specifically, my soft palate and cheekbones.

What did I discover?

An open, expanded, relaxed face and soft palate are crucial to creating a full, open, and beautiful singing tone.

In my personal experience, having a locked right side of my face (caused by tension and stress) can seriously limit vocal range and vocal tone.

Your face is a key RESONATOR for creating beautiful singing tone -- so if you're droopy, tense, or not creating space as you should be, you are seriously cutting off what's possible for you as a singer!

In this video, I'll give you some cues for expanding not just the middle of your soft palate -- but also the left and right sides -- which will, in turn, make pitch and tone much easier for you.

I'll also show you a (hideous!) face stretch that you can do before and during warmups.

Give it a watch and let me know your thoughts!

Love and weird face stretches,

Fel

How to Be a Great Singer Using Musical Phrasing

In today's video we'll explore the question:

What separates a good singer from a GREAT singer?

The answer, in my opinion, is musical phrasing. 

Good singers get the job done and not much more. They think about individual notes and whether or not they can hit them right, and then stop there.

Great singers think about how those notes relate to each other and how they can sculpt them into something memorable and moving.

This is musical phrasing. And it's tons of fun.

Phrasing can be altered by adjusting the following 4 components:
1. Dynamics (how loud or soft you get)
2. Rhythm (how fast or slow you sing the notes)
3. Onset (how you start the line)
4. Cut off (how you end the line)
(Admittedly, there are some more factors, but those are the broadest and most apparent.)

The easiest component for a singer to adjust and make their singing instantly better is the first one -- dynamics, or singing volume.

Watch in the video below as I explain how vocal dynamics have a huge effect on phrasing.


After that I'll demo a "good" version of "The Star Spangled Banner," followed by a "great" -- or at least better 🙂 -- version that has noticeable dynamic variation.

 

In this video I'll also teach you a simple vocal warmup that will help you rehearse dynamic range and learn to control your volume as you sing.

Please enjoy, and let me know your thoughts on phrasing in the comments below!

(And remember to share this with any singers you know hoping to take their voice to the next level!)

xo Fel